Gratitude

Hey all.

Just wanted to send out a little bit of gratitude your way before tomorrow gets outta hand. Turkey, family, wine, Turkey Trots, pie, wine…mmmmm, Thanksgiving!

Even if you are a cynical bastard who thinks Thanksgiving is a crock and the Pilgrims actually stole that food (amongst other things) from the Native Americans and it’s a Hallmark Holiday, the sentiment should not be forgotten or squandered.

Giving thanks for what you have teaches you humility, which in turn gives you grace.

I am humbled by all I have been given in this world. My husband who could not be better suited for me and whom I love with my whole heart. My family which is huge and loving and I wouldn’t trade any of them for the whole world. The Obi-wans who have taught me all I know about being a good person. My gorgeous friends who selflessly share of their time and talents so that I might learn and benefit from their friendship. My teachers who decided it was a good idea to make the rest of us smarter. My city and country where the opportunities abound!

I have been given opportunities that others only dream of and I hope that I am not squandering them. I hope I am being the change I want to see in the world, one day at a time.

I hope that you know how lucky you are and that, at some point tomorrow, you take stock of what you have and give thanks.

Happy Thanksgiving, friends. Gobble, gobble!

Now go out and run!

And you New Yorkers, I’ll see you in a little bit at the Turkey Trot!

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Beat The Runner’s Plateau

In every running career, there will be many plateaus. Sometimes they sneak up on us and we don’t realize they’re happening until we see stagnant race times. Sometimes it’s our running buddies who ask “are you alright?” when we’re lagging behind on every. single. run. Sometimes we find ourselves dreading the everyday run because it just doesn’t feel good anymore. Runner’s plateau sucks.

It happens. Now let’s talk about how to fix it.

First things first. You have to be honest with yourself and ask a few hard questions:

Am I varying the speed and distance of my workouts? This is the most common reason I find for newbie/semi-seasoned runners. If you want results, you gotta mix it up.

Am I cross-training enough (or at all)? Another mistake people make is to think simply running will make you faster. Not true. Aerobic + Anaerobic workouts make you faster.

Am I putting forth 100% effort in my workouts? Only you can answer this question.

Is my schedule the same every day/week? Yikes. Isn’t that boring? I’m plateauing just thinking about it.

Am I getting enough rest? Sleep is where our muscles heal and grow. If you’re not sleeping, neither of these very necessary things are happening.

Do I have a goal? Running for the sake of running is intolerably boring. Even if it’s a 3K/5K Turkey Trot, set a goal. Work for it. It takes the monotony out of the running.

These are the important questions to ask because they will provide you with the answers to get out of your running rut, over the plateau and into a new gear in your running. And we all have multiple gears, like cars, that we can train into and find as we get in better shape. It’s kind of a cool thing when you find yourself pushing and easing into a newer, faster pace.

But that doesn’t just happen. Here are some suggestions to get out of your running rut:

-Substitute one run for another form of cardio. Try swimming or indoor cycling. You never know, you might find you looooove triathlons. Get off your legs and into something new.

-Grab a faster running friend once a week for a short, hard run. Scary, I know. But it helps.

-Join a gym and try some strength training classes. A change of scenery and pace might make you appreciate the solitude and quiet many of us experience on a run.

-Mix it up. Don’t do the same workout for two weeks. Nothing the same, every workout is new and different. No run route is the same. No distance is the same. No class is the same. Try it.

-Kick it up a notch. Indoor cycling (aka “spinning”) is a great way to challenge your cardiovascular system while not beating the hell out of your legs. Push as hard as you can during one class a week and see if you notice a difference in your runs after a month.

-Take a break from running. I know, I know. Runners hate this suggestion. But, seriously, taking a one week/one month break from running to find new ways to move might be just what you need to get back into it with a fresh perspective.

-Set a goal. Sign up for a race. No better way to push yourself than to set a bar to reach and work as hard as you can.

Plateaus are bound to happen to everybody, even (and maybe, especially) the pros. How you handle them is up to you. You can wallow in it and complain about it or you can switch it up, work a little harder, try something new and discover something else about yourself: you have another gear. Who knew?

Now go out and run!

What do you do to get beyond the plateau???